Meridian Cresent, Washington, DC

Twenty-nine stacked towns over structured parking on top of hill overlooking west over DC to the Potomac River (5). Design had to relate to the facing historic building Floors were split with smaller units under two full floor units with top balcony on the west.   We decided on a traditional street front elevation (2, 3, 4) but used a modern contemporary façade on the west (1). This provided a striking presence for the public, and more economical than the street side. Ms. Edwards was the exterior design architect.

Parc Connecticut, Washington, DC

Located on a steep site of the Rock Creek Park stream valley, this apartment building took advantage of the height limits in DC. By using the maximum height from the Avenue side and stepping unit floors down from the main grade in a single loaded corridor into the hillside, five additional floors of apartments were gained overlooking a parkland site perpetually protected by the city. The scale and detailing of the street façade recalls the grand midcentury apartments of Washington, with bay windows and balconies, warm masonry with rusticated and decorative limestone precast. A small pocket park is at the central garden entry court that moderates the noise and bustle of Connecticut Avenue. Ms. Edwards was lead designer for this project

Georgetown Heights, Washington, DC

Upper Georgetown overlooks the city and this project, near the west side of the Vice President’s home is a result of St. Luke’s Church on Calvert Street being in need of capital to finance their congregation’s survival in this location. The adjoining parking lot was underutilized, and afforded a prominent corner site on Wisconsin Avenue. The condominium has 44 luxury units with an internal courtyard with garden. The ability to increase the number of units by using the internal lower level court was carefully manipulated by grades and defining living areas allowed within the FAR and the definition of habitable to useable space.